Rugby World Cup bosses turn down the use of private investment

Rugby World Cup bosses turn down the use of private investment to grow the game as they insist ‘we can achieve the type of ambition we are talking about’

  • Rugby World Cup bosses say they’ll not use private investment to grow the game
  • Private equity has been a growing force in rugby over the last few years
  • Chief executive Alan Gilpin says they can match their ambitions without it

Rugby World Cup bosses have revealed they will not use private equity investment to take the game’s biggest tournament to the next level.

The destinations for both the men’s and women’s World Cups up until 2033 were confirmed in Dublin this week with World Rugby keen to make long-term plans for the future.

Private equity has been a growing force in rugby with CVC Capital Partners now owning a 14 per cent stake in the Six Nations at an investment cost of £365million.

Rugby World Cup bosses have turned down the use of private investment to grow the game 

CVC also own significant shares of both the Gallagher Premiership and United Rugby Championship while their rivals Silver Lake are a growing force in the southern hemisphere.

CVC’s total investment in professional rugby now stands at more than £700m.

World Rugby chief executive Alan Gilpin said he had looked at private equity offers as a means of growing the commercial offerings of future World Cups but opted against such a move.

‘We have looked really hard at that in the last 12 to 18 months, Gilpin said.

Chief executive Alan Gilpin says they can achieve their ambitions without private investment 

‘The pleasing answer is we can achieve the type of ambition we are talking about with these tournaments without doing that.

‘Do we want to see more investment in the sport globally? Yes. If some of that is coming by private investment that is absolutely fine as long as the sport is really benefitting.’

World Rugby hope they can raise ticket sales revenue of $1billion at both the men’s World Cup in Australia in 2027 and in the USA in 2031.




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